MODULAR DESIGN ACTIVITY – assignment

WRITE 1 PARAGRAPH/SECTION PER ITEM LISTED

The story takes place at the park. Two characters, Fletcher and Cameron – converse at a park bench while a third, unbeknownst to them, watches.

1. The Weather.

               The grey skies threatened to snow as the biting cold wind blew from the northwest. You can feel the chill right to the bone.

2. The Watcher’s POV.

               I watch the bench from afar, though not too far as to not observe the oncoming storm, which is my exes. I ensure the men cannot see me as I stand behind a retaining wall. I heard of this rendezvous from a mutual friend, and I cannot wait to see what fireworks occur.

3. A flashback from Fletcher’s past.

I climb out of bed naked. I toss the sheet over the baby-bottomed boy still asleep in the bed.  He looks so young; “he could be my son,” I think as I begin to dress, “he’s quite the looker; he was young. God, he looks so young. He’s eighteen, I checked. I even made him pull out his identification.” I finish getting dressed; I debate whether to wake him and wish him goodbye. In the light of day, the whole night doesn’t feel right. I feel dirty. I jot down a brief note, leaving it on the nightstand; I creep out of the hotel room and down the hall.

4. A physical description of Cameron.

               Cameron is six feet tall. A middle-aged man is in fair shape: he is muscular with a bit of a belly. Like Fletcher, he dresses professionally in causal work attire, although without a hat and never with an umbrella in hand regardless of the weather.

5. Noises or sounds made throughout the park

               Fletcher and Cameron spoke loud enough to hear each other’s conversation over the children’s laughter, shouts, and street construction, although not so loud as to draw their attention.

6. The conversation between Cameron and Fletcher in the park.

               “You slept with my son.”

               “Hum,” I didn’t know what to say to Cameron, and I expected him just to come right out and beat me. I know I might have if it were me in the same situation, “I am not sure what to say. I was drinking heavily, not that that should be an excuse, and it was consensual if that’s any comfort.”

               “It isn’t. I know my son; he would have egged you on. He’s a tease. I am not proud of his behavior at times, but as they say, ‘It is what it is.’ You’re both adults, so there is nothing else to do.”

               “I will apologize if that will make you feel better for sleeping with your son. I regretted it as soon as I woke up the next morning.”

               “It wouldn’t, so don’t bother. You’re a homo?”

               “Yes, I came to that conclusion, and if it got out, it would destroy my marriage.”

               “I am not going to out you, but I won’t let you continue living a lie. You need to come out, starting with Helen, your wife.”
               “I will do it as soon as I get back home.”

               Cameron nods, “You do that. My boy has been gay all his life, and he couldn’t hide it if he tried. I just wish he wasn’t such a tramp and so obvious about it.”

7. Some construction is taking place.

               The jackhammer pounded the pavement, rattling noisily through the surrounding cityscape. Construction workers yell at each other, and the passing vehicles get too near. Cars honk as drivers become impatient, waiting for their turn to pass the construction.

8. Describe any trash that litters the park.

               The discarded newspapers rolled along the grounds as the cold winds gusted. The red and brown fall leaves scattered about in the wind.

9. A flashback of something Cameron wishes he could forget.

               Jack and I were best buds; we were tight as two boys could be. One night, while I was staying over and Jack’s parents were out, we had a game of truth or dare. Jack dared me to play with his penis; one thing led to another, and things just happened. The next morning neither of us said anything; we pretended nothing happened. We never discussed it ever again. I never forgot, but I wasn’t interested in ever trying it again. It was then that I knew I was straight (although I didn’t understand the concept at that time).

10. A physical description of Fletcher.

Fletcher stands six feet three inches tall and has a lean but muscular frame. He has short dark hair, covers with a Fedora hat, kind blue eyes, and a friendly smile. Fletcher wears his Dockers, a crisp shirt, which peaks over the charcoal grey trench, the bottom of which flaps in the wind.

11. Evidence that Fletcher has been waiting for Cameron to show up.

               Fletcher looks at his watch for the third time in twenty minutes. He grumbles, “I will give him another ten minutes. Fletcher paces back and forth in front of the park bench, anxiously awaiting  Cameron’s arrival. He searches the park for Cameron without success; he struggles with the urge to recheck his watch.

12. The Watcher’s POV again.

               I never realized how similar both men are until they stand side-by-side, and their similarities are striking. Well, I do have a type. I watch the two men approach each other, and I expect a fight as soon as they meet; neither do. I observe as the men speak. Their discussion doesn’t last long. Cameron leaves as soon as it ends, while Fletcher says a bit longer.

13. Something that Fletcher had noticed while waiting for Cameron to arrive

               Fletcher observes the number of families playing and sitting in the park and wonders, not for the first time, if they have chosen a good meeting place; the park appears too busy for such an important meeting.

14. An accident that happens to a stranger in the park.

               The little boy on rollerskates skidded, falling and crashing to the ground. He shrieks for his mother, who rushes to comfort him. She picks the boy up, examing him for wounds; she relaxes when she doesn’t see any cuts to the boy.

15. Cameron’s character’s make-up – his inner thoughts – who he truly is.

               Most people think I am a brute, and they don’t know I am a softy at heart. It’s true, and I may look crust; I can assure you I’m not. I know Fletcher’s secret; I couldn’t care less. We all have our secrets we’d rather no one know. His secret may destroy him; well, his life as he knows it anyway. I will not reveal it, so he’s a homo; it’s the twenty-first century; there is no shame in that.

16. Fletcher’s POV of walking towards Cameron as he enters the park.
               Cameron charges into the park, and he seems oblivious to his surroundings, never giving a shit what anyone thinks. “He never changes, that man.” I shake my head. As he nears, I can see his beet-red face as he puffs for breath; he’s moving ahead fast, weaving through the children chasing about the park. He stops in front of me, gasping for air; although, it doesn’t take long for him to catch his breath. We stand there waiting; neither of us speaks. We both know why we’re here.

Same words; different order:

I watch the bench from afar, though not too far as to not observe the oncoming storm, which is my exes. I ensure the men cannot see me as I stand behind a retaining wall. I heard of this rendezvous from a mutual friend, and I cannot wait to see what fireworks occur.

The grey skies threatened to snow as the biting cold wind blew from the northwest. You can feel the chill right to the bone.

The discarded newspapers rolled along the grounds as the cold winds gusted. The red and brown fall leaves scattered about in the wind.

The jackhammer pounded the pavement, rattling noisily through the surrounding city scape. Construction workers yell at each other, and the passing vehicles get too near. Cars honk as drivers become impatient, waiting for their turn to pass the construction.

The little boy on roller-skates skidded, falling and crashing to the ground. He shrieks for his mother, who rushes to comfort him. She picks the boy up, examining him for wounds; she relaxes when she doesn’t see any cuts to the boy.

Fletcher observes the number of families playing and sitting in the park and wonders, not for the first time, if they have chosen a good meeting place; the park appears too busy for such an important meeting.

Fletcher stands six feet three inches tall and has a lean but muscular frame. He has short dark hair, covers with a Fedora hat, kind blue eyes, and a friendly smile. Fletcher wears his Dockers, a crisp shirt, which peaks over the charcoal grey trench, the bottom of which flaps in the wind.

I climb out of bed naked. I toss the sheet over the baby-bottomed boy still asleep in the bed.  He looks so young; “he could be my son,” I think as I begin to dress, “he’s quite the looker; he was young. God, he looks so young. He’s eighteen, I checked. I even made him pull out his identification.” I finish getting dressed; I debate whether to wake him and wish him goodbye. In the light of day, the whole night doesn’t feel right. I feel dirty. I jot down a brief note, leaving it on the nightstand; I creep out of the hotel room and down the hall.

Fletcher looks at his watch for the third time in twenty minutes. He grumbles, “I will give him another ten minutes. Fletcher paces back and forth in front of the park bench, anxiously awaiting  Cameron’s arrival. He searches the park for Cameron without success; he struggles with the urge to recheck his watch.

Fletcher stands six feet three inches tall and has a lean but muscular frame. He has short dark hair, covers with a Fedora hat, kind blue eyes, and a friendly smile. Fletcher wears his Dockers, a crisp shirt, which peaks over the charcoal grey trench, the bottom of which flaps in the wind.

Cameron is six feet tall. A middle-aged man is in fair shape: he is muscular with a bit of a belly. Like Fletcher, he dresses professionally in causal work attire, although without a hat and never with an umbrella in hand regardless of the weather.

Most people think I am a brute, and they don’t know I am a softy at heart. It’s true, and I may look crust; I can assure you I’m not. I know Fletcher’s secret; I couldn’t care less. We all have our secrets we’d rather no one know. His secret may destroy him; well, his life as he knows it anyway. I will not reveal it, so he’s a homo; it’s the twenty-first century; there is no shame in that.

Jack and I were best buds; we were tight as two boys could be. One night, while I was staying over and Jack’s parents were out, we had a game of truth or dare. Jack dared me to play with his penis; one thing led to another, and things just happened. The next morning neither of us said anything; we pretended nothing happened. We never discussed it ever again. I never forgot, but I wasn’t interested in ever trying it again. It was then that I knew I was straight (although I didn’t understand the concept at that time).

Cameron charges into the park, and he seems oblivious to his surroundings, never giving a shit what anyone thinks. “He never changes, that man.” I shake my head. As he nears, I can see his beet-red face as he puffs for breath; he’s moving ahead fast, weaving through the children chasing about the park. He stops in front of me, gasping for air; although, it doesn’t take long for him to catch his breath. We stand there waiting; neither of us speaks. We both know why we’re here.

Fletcher and Cameron speak loud enough to hear each other’s conversation over the children’s laughter, shouts, and street construction, although not so loud as to draw their attention.

“You slept with my son.”

 “Hum,” I didn’t know what to say to Cameron, and I expected him just to come right out and beat me. I know I might have if it were me in the same situation, “I am not sure what to say. I was drinking heavily, not that that should be an excuse, and it was consensual if that’s any comfort.”

 “It isn’t. I know my son; he would have egged you on. He’s a tease. I am not proud of his behavior at times, but as they say, ‘It is what it is.’ You’re both adults, so there is nothing else to do.”

 “I will apologize if that will make you feel better for sleeping with your son. I regretted it as soon as I woke up the next morning.”

“It wouldn’t, so don’t bother. You’re a homo?”

“Yes, I came to that conclusion, and if it got out, it would destroy my marriage.”

“I am not going to out you, but I won’t let you continue living a lie. You need to come out, starting with Helen, your wife.”

Cameron nods, “You do that. My boy has been gay all his life, and he couldn’t hide it if he tried. I just wish he wasn’t such a tramp and so obvious about it.”

I never realized how similar both men are until they stand side-by-side, and their similarities are striking. Well, I do have a type. I watch the two men approach each other, and I expect a fight as soon as they meet; neither do. I observe as the men speak. Their discussion doesn’t last long; Cameron leaves as soon as it ends, while Fletcher says a bit longer.
—Robert Confiant 23 October 2021

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